WEBCAM

 

Webcam masses during Level 5 of the government’s new COVID-19 Resilience and National Recovery Plan.

Unfortunately the Church is closed for public church services which includes all Masses.  Please refer to the Mass times below.

Daily Masses: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday (no Wednesday Mass) at 10 am

Saturday Vigil – 6 pm 

Sunday Masses – 11am only  (There will be no 9 am or 6 pm Mass)

Click here for WEBCAM

Parish Office Opening Hours

Thursday’s only from 10am to 12pm. 

(During Level 5 of the government’s new COVID-19 Resilience and National Recovery Plan)

 

Support Services for Older and Vulnerable People

Homily

    

 

In the Gospel, St Matthew collects into one place many of Jesus’ strong criticisms of the Scribes and Pharisees – mainly two.  One is the general strictness of their interpretation of the law, a strictness that wasn’t humane.

 

With their 613 rules and regulations, they were making religion an intolerable burden. If any religion makes life depressing instead of joyful, a hindrance rather than a help, a weight to drag one down instead of wings to lift one up, it’s a menace to people.

 

The second criticism is of religious leader’s vanity and hypocrisy and obsession with power.  Jesus criticises the use of titles for mere ostentation, arrogance or pomposity.  He repeats what he had said elsewhere: “Whoever exalts himself will be humbled, whoever humbles himself will be exalted”.  As St Augustine said, there’s something in humility that exalts the mind and something in exaltation that closes it.  Humility makes the mind subject to what is superior – ultimately, God.

 

Christ speaks plainly and truthfully.  It is a disturbing thing, someone who says what they mean, who speaks from the heart, directly, plainly, honestly.  Simplicity can be a risky business.

 

What if Christ really means most of what he says, just as he says it?  What if he really meant the Beatitudes?  The peacemakers are the Children of God.  The gentle, the humble, will see God.  Those who hunger and thirst for holiness, not power, not position, not wealth, they will be the people of the new Kingdom.  What if it is all meant very literally, what if we are to be judged on what we do, not what we profess?  A stumbling block indeed for a Christianity tangled up in its own issues and causes and movements.

 

Christianity isn’t so difficult to discuss, after all.  But it can be pretty challenging to live.

 

May we all have the wisdom to pray for God’s grace.           Fr Andrew